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Recent Activities

Introducing Board Member Philippe Neyret, M.D.

Posted by on in Meetings

neyret

At the PFF Board meeting on March 6, 2008, members of the Board welcomed Philippe Neyret, M.D., of Lyon France to the Board of Directors.

Dr. Neyret is Professor and Chief of Orthopedics Department in Lyon (France), after the famous Alfred Trillat and Henri Dejour. The Lyon school is known for its expertise in the field of knee surgery and particularly patellofemoral disorders. The Lyon team has published results of many clinical investigations and books. Dr. Neyret serves many prestigious international societies such as ISAKOS, ESSKA, EFORT... He has particular interest in sport and soccer injuries.

For a full list of Patellofemoral Foundation Board of Directors click here.

PFF General Statement of Agreement

Posted by on in Meetings

Patellofemoral General Agreement Statement from the PFF/ IPSG Consensus meeting sponsored by DJO International on March 6, 2008

  • Focal loading can be a cause of PF pain.
  • Overuse or at times cyclical overload of soft tissue or bone areas may explain the unusual and sometimes ill defined nature of anterior knee pain in some patients (Dye theory of envelope of load acceptance) Treatment should establish load reduction.
  • Patellofemoral imbalance (including but not limited to malalignment) may cause pain by virtue of cyclical soft tissue and/or bone overload.
  • Focal supraphysiological loading can, in some patients, be a cause of PF pain.
  • Structural damage of articular cartilage does not always result in anterior knee pain. However, there is growing evidence that a subset of patients with chondral lesions may have a component of their pain related to that lesion.

There are many alternatives for non-operative PF pain treatment that should be considered some of which may include medications that affect neural pain transmission.

History, exam, imaging and response to treatment (differential injection, specific unloading, medication and multidisciplinary evaluation) should correlate well and be consistent in order to localize pathology and to make a precise diagnosis. Treatment should be developed based on the most precise diagnosis possible. Persistence of pain may be related to inaccurate appraisal of the cause of pain and/or inappropriate treatment decisions, patient non-compliance or complications of surgical treatment.
A patient’s active participation and understanding in his/her treatment is necessary for optimal results.

PFF has established close working relationships with the International Society of Arthorscopy, Knee Surgery and Orthopedic Sports Medicine (ISAKOS), the International Patellofemoral Study Group (IPSG) and the Arthroscopy Association of North America (AANA).

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Pictured: Board Members Left-Right: Philippe Neyret, M.D., Eric Dahlinger, M.D,  Jack Bert, M.D. (incoming president of AANA) Peter Jokl M.D., Jack Farr, M.D., John Fulkerson, M.D, Eric Jania,  and Anthony Schepsis, M.D.

Patellofemoral Foundation Board of Directors meeting with Jack Bert, incoming president of the Arthroscopy Association of North America (AANA), in San Francisco on March 6, 2008.   The Board of Directors welcomed Jack Bert, incoming president of the Arthroscopy Association of North America(AANA), to the meeting and discussed a strategic alliance of the PFF with AANA to promote education of orthopedic surgeons about the patellofemoral joint. A proposal regarding this relationship was submitted to the AANA Board of Directors At its Board of Directors meeting April 2008, The Arthroscopy Association of North America (AANA) approved a formal relationship with the Patellofemoral Foundation (PFF) as a way of fostering and promoting patellofemoral research and education.

The shared goal is to foster and promote more and better education for AANA members regarding patellofemoral problems, as these can be complex and difficult to treat at times. PFF hopes to help AANA assume a leadership role worldwide in patellofemoral education, particularly as anterior knee pain (AKA patellofemoral pain) is very common among athletes and workers, as well as the elderly.

isakos ipsg aana

 

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